Sunday, June 25, 2017

ODOT: Valley, No. Coast

ODOT: Valley, No. Coast: OR 126 Florence-Eugene Highway is open in both directions. The road was closed overnight at milepost 1 in Florence for a police investigation and opened just after 4 a.m.

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2 alarm apartment fire displaces several families (Photo)

2 ALARM APARTMENT FIRE DISPLACES SEVERAL FAMILIES (PHOTO)


News Release from Clackamas Fire Dist. #1
Posted on FlashAlert: June 25th, 2017 1:42 AM
Downloadable file: 119.JPG
Downloadable file: 108.JPG
Downloadable file: Ladder for ventilation
Downloadable file: Multiple deck fires
No one was hurt in a multiple unit apartment fire located at the Riverwalk Apartments on SE Causey rd. in Clackamas. What appears to have started on a patio quickly extended into the apartment and neighboring units. Clackamas Firefighters from several stations responded to the fire and quickly suppressed the flames. No one was injured. The American Red Cross was notified to help with the displaced families.

Clackamas Fire wants to remind everyone to make sure they have working smoke detectors and make sure all BBQ's are clear of combustibles during cooking and while the unit cools.
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Saturday, June 24, 2017

Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Four People in Tillamook County

RED CROSS RESPONDS TO HOME FIRE AFFECTING FOUR PEOPLE IN TILLAMOOK COUNTY


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 11:31 PM
Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on June 24, 2017, in the 9000 block of Sitka Ave in Nehalem, OR. The fire affected four people, including one adult and three children.
The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.
The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
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Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Four People in Cowlitz County

RED CROSS RESPONDS TO HOME FIRE AFFECTING FOUR PEOPLE IN COWLITZ COUNTY


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 11:27 PM
Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on June 24, 2017, in the 700 block of Green Mountain Rd in Woodland, WA. The fire affected four people, including three adults, one child and six pets.
The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.
The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
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Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Five People in Douglas County

RED CROSS RESPONDS TO HOME FIRE AFFECTING FIVE PEOPLE IN DOUGLAS COUNTY


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 11:22 PM
Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on June 24, 2017, at approximately 5:30 p.m. in the 600 block of NE Johnson St in Myrtle Creek, OR. The fire affected five people, including three adults and two children.
The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.
The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
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Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Six People in Battleground

RED CROSS RESPONDS TO HOME FIRE AFFECTING SIX PEOPLE IN BATTLEGROUND


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 11:13 PM
Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on June 24, 2017, at approximately 6 p.m. in the 100 block of SW 19th Place in Battleground, WA. The fire affected six people, including three adults and three children.
The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.
The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
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Suspect in Faubion School Phone Threats Identified, Taken to Unity Center for Treatment

SUSPECT IN FAUBION SCHOOL PHONE THREATS IDENTIFIED, TAKEN TO UNITY CENTER FOR TREATMENT


News Release from Portland Police Bureau
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 8:28 PM
On Friday June 23, 2017, at approximately 2:15 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to 2231 North Flint Avenue on the report of a telephone threat. Faubion School is temporarily using the building formerly known as Harriet Tubman Middle School. This school is immediately south of Lillis Albina Park, which is hosting the Good in the Hood Multicultural Music, Art, and Foods Festival this weekend.

Officers spoke with the reporting party, the school principal, by phone and learned that the principal received a phone call from a woman asking about the school, the address, and who was at the school. The caller also made threats about a shooting at the school.

During the investigation, officers learned that the call likely originated from a residence in Northwest Portland and they developed leads on the identity of the possible caller. Based on the preliminary investigation, officers did not believe the threat to be credible.

Officers worked with community members familiar with the 63-year-old female suspect to develop a plan to contact her safely. On Saturday, officers and licensed mental health professionals from Project Respond contacted the woman at a Northeast Portland location. The woman was taken to the Unity Center for mental health treatment.

The woman has not been charged with any crimes at this time and the reports will be forwarded to the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office for review. The Portland Police Bureau's Behavioral Health Unit (BHU) will also follow up the investigation. To learn more about BHU, visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/62135

###PPB###
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Firefighters Battle Challenging Conditions to Prevent Brush Fire from Spreading (Photo)

FIREFIGHTERS BATTLE CHALLENGING CONDITIONS TO PREVENT BRUSH FIRE FROM SPREADING (PHOTO)


News Release from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 8:22 PM
Downloadable file: IMG_0018.JPG
Downloadable file: IMG_0017.JPG
Downloadable file: IMG_0015.JPG
At 3:27 this afternoon crews were dispatched to a reported brush fire at 22755 SW Hillsboro Hwy. in the Chehalem Mountain area, north of Newberg. Initial reports to 911 indicated that the fire was approximately 20 by 20 feet and started by smoldering timber piles that grew out of control. First arriving crews on scene confirmed a brush fire that was not threatening any structures. The site presented several challenges to firefighting efforts. These challenges included steep terrain, one hundred-plus degree temperatures, and late afternoon wind. Due to the challenges presented to firefighters additional resources were requested to quickly gain control of the fire.

In addition to fire engines, brush-rigs and water tenders were dispatched. Brush-rigs are four-wheel-drive vehicles that are capable of accessing fires in rugged terrain. Water tenders shuttle water to the scene in areas without hydrants. Sixty firefighters worked to extinguish the fire and TVF&R was assisted by Hillsboro Fire and Rescue and Dundee Fire. There were no reported injuries and no structures were damaged.

Firefighters will likely remain on scene for several hours and possibly overnight as they continue to mop up and check for hot spots. It is estimated that Hillsboro Hwy. will be closed for another two hours.

A fire investigator is on scene and working to determine the cause of the fire. Though the cause of the fire remains under investigation, today's fire serves as a reminder that recent hot weather has created dry conditions that increase the potential of vegetation fires. Firefighters urge caution when using any potential ignition sources during these hot conditions.

###
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ODOT: Valley, No. Coast

ODOT: Valley, No. Coast: OR 126 Florence - Eugene Highway is closed at milepost 1, just east of U.S. 101, for a police investigation. Travelers are advised to avoid the area and find alternate routes. The roadway is expected to be closed for an extended period. Check TripCheck.com for updates.

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Missing Gresham Man Located

MISSING GRESHAM MAN LOCATED


News Release from Gresham Police Dept
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 7:02 PM
Missing Gresham man Michael Armstrong has been located and is safe at home. Thanks to all that assisted in locating him.
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Police Seek Help Locating Missing Gresham Man (Photo)

POLICE SEEK HELP LOCATING MISSING GRESHAM MAN (PHOTO)


News Release from Gresham Police Dept
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 6:42 PM
Downloadable file: Armstrong
Gresham, Ore. -- Gresham Police is asking for the public's assistance in locating a missing 69 year old man with dementia. Michael Armstrong was last seen at his Gresham residence today around 4:30 p.m. Armstrong is a Caucasian male with gray hair and beard, approximately 5-feet-8-inches tall and 170 pounds. He was last seen wearing a blue baseball cap, blue jacket and blue jeans.

Anyone who knows of Armstrong's whereabouts is encouraged to call the non-emergency police dispatch line at 503.823.3333 or if needed, 911.
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Police Seek Help Locating Missing Gresham Man

POLICE SEEK HELP LOCATING MISSING GRESHAM MAN


News Release from Gresham Police Dept
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 6:42 PM
Gresham, Ore. -- Gresham Police is asking for the public's assistance in locating a missing 69 year old man with dementia. Michael Armstrong was last seen at his Gresham residence today around 4:30 p.m. Armstrong is a Caucasian male with gray hair and beard, approximately 5-feet-8-inches tall and 170 pounds. He was last seen wearing a blue baseball cap, blue jacket and blue jeans.

Anyone who knows of Armstrong's whereabouts is encouraged to call the non-emergency police dispatch line at 503.823.3333 or if needed, 911.
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World Naked Bike Ride Tonight #PDXWNBR - Riders Urged to Wear Helmets and Shoes (Photo)

WORLD NAKED BIKE RIDE TONIGHT #PDXWNBR - RIDERS URGED TO WEAR HELMETS AND SHOES (PHOTO)


News Release from Portland Police Bureau
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 6:00 PM
Downloadable file: WNBR.jpg
The World Naked Bike Ride is set to roll through the streets of Portland tonight, June 24, 2017, at 9:00 p.m., starting from Northeast Portland's Fernhill Park and ride throughout the city.

In past years, this event has drawn an estimated 10,000 bicycle riders. According to the World Naked Bike Ride website, the event is an annual, worldwide bike ride that highlights the vulnerability of cyclists everywhere and decries society's dependence on pollution-based transport.

The Portland Police Bureau will have officers dedicated to the event to ensure everyone is safe and to provide assistance at intersections. There may be short traffic delays and drivers or non-participants are asked in advance for their patience.

Portland City Code 14A.40.030 (Indecent Exposure) states the following:

It is unlawful for any person to expose his or her genitalia while in a public place or place visible from a public place, if the public place is open or available to persons of the opposite sex.

Although many participants may violate the letter of the Portland City Code, the Police Bureau will be exercising discretion for this protest event as long as participants stay on the route with the rest of the riders. People who "start early" and potentially disrupt other neighborhood events not associated with the official ride may not receive the same discretion.

At a bare minimum, the Portland Police Bureau recommends that riders at least wear a helmet and shoes to avoid any potential injuries. Bike lights are also highly recommended for riders as well as plenty of water or fluids.

For more information on the ride, visit http://www.pdxwnbr.org

###PPB###
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Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Two People in Rainier

RED CROSS RESPONDS TO HOME FIRE AFFECTING TWO PEOPLE IN RAINIER


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 4:53 PM
Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on June 24, 2017, at approximately 12:30 p.m. in the 76000 block of SW Davis Rd in Rainier, OR. The fire affected two adults.
The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.
The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
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Fire Destroys Cornelius Home (Photo)

FIRE DESTROYS CORNELIUS HOME (PHOTO)


News Release from Cornelius Fire Dept.
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 10:33 AM
Downloadable file: IMG_2501.JPG
Downloadable file: IMG_2495.JPG
Downloadable file: IMG_2490.JPG
Downloadable file: IMG_2487.JPG
Last night, June 23rd at 7:36pm, firefighters were sent to a reported house fire in the 100 block of North 5th Place in Cornelius. Crews arrived shortly later to find heavy fire and smoke coming from the rear of a double wide mobile home. Firefighters deployed multiple hose lines to knock down the flames and prevent the flames from spreading to nearby homes. Before firefighters could knocked down the flames from the rear of the house, the flames had spread into the roof void of the house, which is difficult to access. Due to the complexity of the fire hidden in the roof void and 80 degree temperatures, a 2nd Alarm was dispatched to bring in additional resources from neighboring departments.

Due to direct flame exposure to the lightweight roof construction, the roof began to weaken and then collapsed. Because if this, it was not safe for firefighters to be inside the structure and had to withdraw and fight the flames from outside. It took firefighters almost 2 hours to fully extinguish the fire and its major hot spots. No residents or firefighters were injured in the incident.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation, but is believed to have started in a shed located on the rear of the structure. The home is considered a total loss. The residents of the home are being assisted by Red Cross, as well as two neighboring homes which had displaced residents due to heavy smoke damage in their homes.

Cornelius Fire was assisted on scene by Forest Grove Fire & Rescue, Gaston Fire District, Hillsboro Fire & Rescue, Banks Fire District, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and Washington County Sheriffs Office.

--------------------

Call information:
Engines: 7
Truck: 1
Fire Medic: 1
Support: 2
Chiefs: 2

Total fire personnel: 40


# # #
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Red Cross Responds to Multi-Family Home Fire in Cornelius

RED CROSS RESPONDS TO MULTI-FAMILY HOME FIRE IN CORNELIUS


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 9:10 AM
Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on June 23, 2017, at approximately 9:30 p.m. in the 100 block of N. 5th place in Cornelius, Oregon. The fire affected 14 people, including nine adults, five children and multiple pets.
The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.
The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
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Deputies Make 12 DUII Arrests on First Friday Night of Summer (Photo)

DEPUTIES MAKE 12 DUII ARRESTS ON FIRST FRIDAY NIGHT OF SUMMER (PHOTO)


News Release from Washington County Sheriff's Office
Posted on FlashAlert: June 24th, 2017 8:10 AM
Downloadable file: Emmylea Williams
Downloadable file: Jared Sabin
Downloadable file: Rollover crash #2
Downloadable file: Rollover crash #1
Downloadable file: Media Release
Media Release

Deputies Make 12 DUII Arrests on First Friday Night of Summer

June 24, 2017 -- Deputies arrested a dozen DUII drivers on the first Friday night of Summer. Two drivers and one passenger were arrested after two rollover crashes in western Washington County.

On the evening of Friday, June 23, 2017, deputies from the Washington County Sheriff's Office arrested 12 drivers for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (DUII). Two drivers and one passenger were arrested after two separate rollover crashes.

Just after midnight, deputies were dispatched to NW Cornelius Pass Road and NW Old Cornelius Pass Road on a reported rollover crash. They learned that a passenger of a Dodge SUV jerked the steering wheel to avoid hitting a deer. The passenger was concerned that the driver had not seen it. The actions of the passenger caused the driver to lose control of the vehicle and injured a third person in the car. No deer was hurt.

It is extremely dangerous and illegal for passengers to interfere with the operation of a moving vehicle. The driver, Jared Sabin, 25, of Portland, was arrested for DUII. His blood-alcohol content was almost twice the legal limit. The passenger, 24-year-old Emmylea Williams, also of Portland, was arrested for Reckless Endangering.

Mugshots:
Jared Sabin
Emmylea Williams

Just after 12:15 a.m., deputies were called to the 32000 block of SW Johnson School Road on another rollover crash. They found a late-model Subaru on its side. Excessive speed and alcohol played a role in this crash.

The 22-year-old driver, Dean Cockeram, of Forest Grove, was transported to a metro-area hospital for injuries sustained in the crash. He was later cited for DUII, Reckless Driving and Criminal Mischief.

No mugshot is available for Mr. Cockeram.

In addition to these incidents, deputies arrested another ten drivers for DUII on the first Friday night of Summer. The Washington County Sheriff's Office partners with the Oregon Department of Transportation to provide extra deputies dedicated to DUII enforcement on county roadways.

The arrest and apprehension of DUII drivers is an enforcement priority for the sheriff's office. On average, our deputies arrest 1,000 impaired drivers each year. DUII is a 100% preventable crime. The Washington County Sheriff's Office encourages the public to designate a driver when they consume substances that could impair their ability to drive. Other alternative forms of transportation, such as taxis or app-based Uber or Lyft, are readily available in the metro area.
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Friday, June 23, 2017

Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Two People in Jackson County

RED CROSS RESPONDS TO HOME FIRE AFFECTING TWO PEOPLE IN JACKSON COUNTY


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 7:38 PM
Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on June 23, 2017, at approximately 6:30 p.m. in the 2500 block of Merry Lane in White City, Oregon. The fire affected two adults.
The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.
The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
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Deputies Investigate Construction Flagger Struck and Killed by Dump Truck in Happy Valley. (Photo)

DEPUTIES INVESTIGATE CONSTRUCTION FLAGGER STRUCK AND KILLED BY DUMP TRUCK IN HAPPY VALLEY. (PHOTO)


News Release from Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 7:12 PM
Downloadable file: Crash Scene #2
Downloadable file: Crash Scene #1
Please reference CCSO case number 17- 16733


On June 23, 2017 just after 4:12pm, Deputies with the Happy Valley Police Department responded to an injury traffic crash near the intersection of SE 132nd Ave. and SE Rose Meadow Dr. in Happy Valley. Initial reports indicated that a construction flagger had been struck by a dump truck. Personnel with the Happy Valley Police Department, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, Clackamas Fire District, and American Medical Response arrived on scene and pronounced the flagger deceased.


Initial reports indicate that crews with Northwest Natural Gas had been on scene of a natural gas leak in the area, and had SE 132nd Ave. completely closed to traffic. A dump truck, on scene to help aid crews with the gas leak, experienced mechanical problems. As the dump truck operator was attempting to remove his truck from the construction area, he struck and killed the 71 year old flagger. Neither the truck driver nor the flagger were employees of Northwest Natural Gas. The names of those two companies are not being released at this time.


As crews with Northwest Natural Gas continued to try and fix the gas leak, the Sheriff's Office Criminal Reconstruction and Forensic Team (CRAFT) responded to the scene and assisted in the investigation. The Clackamas County Medical Examiner's Office also responded to the scene and removed the body of the flagger for further investigation.


The investigation surrounding the crash is still ongoing; no arrests have been made at this time. Additionally, the names of those involved in this incident are not being released at this time to allow for family notifications and the investigation to be completed.


The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office would like to continue to encourage everyone to drive with extreme caution in and around construction zones. CCSO would also like to thank all of the first responders who assisted in the investigation, as well as the men and women with Northwest Natural Gas for their extreme professionalism during this challenging incident.


Two Clackamas County cities -- Happy Valley and Wilsonville -- contract with the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office to provide municipal police services.


[END]


Deputy Hayden Sanders
Office of Public Information
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office
9101 SE Sunnybrook Blvd.
Clackamas OR, 97015
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Former Oregon State Police Evidence Technician Arrested in Klamath County

FORMER OREGON STATE POLICE EVIDENCE TECHNICIAN ARRESTED IN KLAMATH COUNTY


News Release from Oregon State Police
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 5:59 PM
On June 23, 2017, Oregon State Police troopers and detectives arrested former Oregon State Police Evidence Technician Mark Matlick, age 57 of Klamath Falls. Matlick was employed with the Oregon State Police from 2007 through 2015 at the Klamath Falls Area Command.

In October of 2016, command staff from the Klamath Falls Oregon State Police Area Command became aware evidence had been unlawfully removed from the evidence lockers located in Klamath Falls and Lakeview. A lengthy investigation was conducted by Oregon State Police detectives, OSP support staff, and investigators from the Oregon Department of Justice. The investigation was conducted in consultation with Klamath County and Lake County District Attorney's Offices.

The investigation regarding the Klamath Falls evidence locker revealed the following: between the dates of November 13, 2007, and June 30, 2015, Mark Matlick, while acting in the capacity of the evidence technician for the Oregon State Police stole over $10,000 of money from the OSP evidence locker. Additionally, Matlick forged written instruments and tampered with the OSP evidence database (public records) to facilitate his thefts.

Matlick was lodged on the following charges in Klamath County: One count of Aggravated Theft, 29 counts of Computer Crime, 19 counts of Tampering with Public Records, two counts of Forgery in the Second Degree, 19 counts of Official Misconduct in the First Degree, one count of Theft in the First Degree and four counts of Theft in Second Degree.

The investigation in Lake County is on-going.

In the last couple of years, the Oregon State Police have made efforts to improve the integrity and security of evidence maintained under the control of the Oregon State Police Evidence Program. In regards to currency, OSP no longer holds any more than $100.00 in evidence at any given point in time. When the total combined amount of currency rises above $100.00, the currency is secured in a bank account. Additionally, annual inventories are conducted in all evidence lockers which is a practice consistent with the national standard and the destruction policy has been improved with additional layers of oversight.

Questions should be directed to the Klamath County District Attorney, Eve Costello.


##

Arrest Made in Shooting of 9-Year-Old and Mother (Photo)

ARREST MADE IN SHOOTING OF 9-YEAR-OLD AND MOTHER (PHOTO)


News Release from Gresham Police Dept
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 5:47 PM
Downloadable file: Nakiem Brown
GRESHAM, Ore.-- Gresham Police have made an arrest in the May 22 shooting of a 9-year-old and his mother. Nakiem Brown, 23 of Portland, was arrested today and charged with eight counts of attempted aggravated murder, one count of conspiracy to commit aggravated murder, one count of conspiracy to commit murder, two counts of assault in the first degree, one count of burglary in the first degree, five counts of unlawful use of a weapon and one count of felon in possession of a firearm.

Detectives are still investigating the circumstances leading to the shooting. The case is active and on-going. Anyone with tips regarding the shooting is asked to call the Gresham Police at 503.618.2719.

No further information is available at this time.
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ODOT: Central Ore.

ODOT: Central Ore.: US97 has re-opened all traffic following crash involving multiple vehicles.

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Grand Jury Determines Officer's Use of Deadly Force Justified in May 2017 Shooting in Southeast Portland (Photo)

GRAND JURY DETERMINES OFFICER'S USE OF DEADLY FORCE JUSTIFIED IN MAY 2017 SHOOTING IN SOUTHEAST PORTLAND (PHOTO)


News Release from Portland Police Bureau
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 5:00 PM
Downloadable file: Terrell_Johnson_24.jpg
On Thursday June 22, 2017, a Multnomah County Grand Jury determined that a Portland Police Bureau officer was justified in the use of deadly force in the May 2017 shooting of 24-year-old Terrell Kyreem Johnson. The grand jury determined that the use of deadly force against Johnson was a lawful exercise of self-defense under Oregon law.

The Portland Police Bureau officer involved in the shooting is Samson Ajir, an eight-year-veteran of the Bureau assigned to the Transit Police Division. The Bureau anticipates he will be returning to full duty next week.

The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputy partnered with Officer Ajir in the Transit Police Division was Deputy AJ Ajir -- Officer Ajir's brother.

During the investigation, detectives learned that Johnson was acting erratically and threatening people at the Flavel Street Transit Station which prompted a 9-1-1 call for police. The caller described Johnson as a white male, provided a clothing description, and a description of Johnson's behavior to the call-taker with the Bureau of Emergency Communications (BOEC).

The first arriving officer at the scene was Officer Jacob Howell of the West Linn Police Department, assigned to the Transit Police Division. Officer Howell was in the early stages of his investigation into the report and was speaking with Johnson, who was non-compliant and would not sit down. As Officer Ajir and Deputy Ajir arrived, Johnson ran from the officers -- first westbound on Flavel then back eastbound before running northbound on the MAX bridge over Johnson Creek.

Officer Ajir was in close proximity to Johnson during the foot chase. Johnson reversed course and turned towards Officer Ajir and advanced towards him while displaying a utility knife, prompting Officer Ajir to unholster his handgun and fire multiple times, striking Johnson. After Johnson was down on the ground, additional officers arrived and approached Johnson with a shield for officer-safety, then began rendering immediate medical aid until paramedics arrived. Paramedics determined that Johnson was deceased. A utility knife was recovered from the scene.

As part of the use of force review process, the Bureau will conduct an internal review of the entire incident and the case will go before the Police Review Board (PRB), which is comprised of community members, Bureau members and representatives from the Independent Police Review Division.

The investigative files and grand jury transcripts will be posted on the Bureau's Open Data page when they are made available and can be found here: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/52175

The photo of Johnson that is being released was from an April 29, 2017, arrest. At the time of the shooting, Johnson did not have a fixed address and a family member had an active restraining order/protective order against Johnson. According to Johnson's family, he had been struggling with drug addiction that they believe may have affected his mental health. Johnson had no mental health history on file with the Portland Police Bureau.

###PPB###
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ODOT: Central Ore.

ODOT: Central Ore.: US97 open to one lane of travel in alternating directions controlled by flaggers 12 miles north of La Pine following crash involving multiple vehicles.

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ODOT: Central Ore.

ODOT: Central Ore.: US97 closed 12 miles north of La Pine due to crash involving multiple vehicles. ODOT on scene. Detour established. Extensive investigation likely.

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ODOT: Central Ore.

ODOT: Central Ore.: UD97 closed 12 miles north of La Pine due to crash involving multiple vehicles. ODOT on scene. Detour established. Extensive investigation likely.

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Silverton Fire District Combat Potential Water Related Tragedies (Photo)

SILVERTON FIRE DISTRICT COMBAT POTENTIAL WATER RELATED TRAGEDIES (PHOTO)


News Release from Silverton Fire Dist.
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 3:29 PM
Downloadable file: New Life Jacket Loaner Station
For the Silverton Fire District, helping to save lives is more than putting fires out and prying patients out of wrecked cars...prevention is always a major part of any lifesaving effort. After experiencing several near drownings and some water related fatalities, Deputy Chief Ed Grambusch and Lt. Rick Heuchert decided that there was more that could be done to reduce these tragedies. Providing personal flotation devices...aka life jackets, to people who may need them was the logical choice.

Under the guidance of Lt. Heuchert, the Silverton Fire District Youth Explorer Post decided that they wanted to do their part for the community. They raised the money and other donations needed to purchase the life jackets and all the materials needed to construct the life jacket loaner stations. Their hard work and with the generous support from the City of Silverton, Citizen's Bank, Kiwanis, Marion County Public Works, Edward Jones; Tim Yount's Office, and Withers Lumber the life jacket loaners stations became a reality and were erected at the Silverton City Park and the Silverton Reservoir.

These life jacket loaner stations were constructed by the Fire District Explorer Post and hold several adult and youth sized personal flotation devices. The process is simple, take them off the hangers and use them and then put them back when you are done with them. There is no charge for this service.

Lt. Heuchert and the Explorer Post are not settling for just two sites for this program. They plan on constructing another loaner station at the County Park in Scotts Mills and possibly other locations within the Fire District.

The attached picture is of Lt. Heuchert, Adviser Keith Smith and members of the Silverton Fire District Explorer Post at a newly constructed loaner station.

####
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Proper fireworks disposal can prevent fires, injury and stream contamination

PROPER FIREWORKS DISPOSAL CAN PREVENT FIRES, INJURY AND STREAM CONTAMINATION


News Release from Clark Co. WA Communications
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 2:37 PM
Vancouver, Wash. - Even after they light up the night sky, fireworks remain potential sources of fire and worker injury. Improper disposal of fireworks puts waste and recycling workers at increased risk of injury from fires in their trucks and at transfer stations. Fireworks are not recyclable and will contaminate materials that are.

Tips for proper disposal of USED fireworks:

* Do not place ANY fireworks or ANY part of fireworks in your recycling cart. All used fireworks should be treated as garbage and disposed of as follows:
o Put used fireworks in a bucket of water overnight. Remove them from the water and put
them in a garbage bag and into your garbage can.
o Dump the water onto grass or dirt or other landscape where it won't flow into a storm
drain and into the river. DO NOT pour onto pavement or into the street.

Tips for proper disposal of UNUSED fireworks:

* DO NOT put in your garbage or recycling; they are explosives and can cause serious harm to workers and the environment.
* DO NOT take them to the transfer stations; workers cannot accept explosives.
* DO take them to the following locations between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday-Friday, except holidays. Fireworks must be given directly to personnel, not left in lobby or outside unattended.
o Clark County residents:
?,? Public Safety Complex -- 505 N.W. 179th St., Ridgefield
o Vancouver residents:
?,? Vancouver Police Department East Precinct -- 520 S.E. 115th Ave.
?,? Vancouver Police Department West Precinct -- 2800 N.E. Stapleton Rd.
o Camas/Washougal residents:
?,? Station 41 -- 616 N.E. 4th Ave., Camas
?,? Station 42 -- 4321 N.W. Parker St., Camas
?,? Station 43 -- 1400 A St., Washougal
* Note on "duds:" if a firework fails to ignite, an adult should approach it carefully after waiting at least 15 minutes, and place it in a bucket of water. After soaking overnight, remove it from the water and treat it as an UNUSED firework.

Report homemade explosive devices or altered fireworks

* Do not attempt to move or transport homemade explosive devices or altered fireworks for disposal. They will not be accepted at the above locations. Call 911 and report them for removal.

Residents should use fireworks only during legal discharge times, which vary across the county. It is illegal to discharge any fireworks in the city of Vancouver. For a chart showing when fireworks can legally be used in different areas, go to http://tinyurl.com/ycwmmgsr.

Failing to clean up fireworks residue is littering, a violation of Washington law and Clark County ordinance.
###
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UPDATE - Public's Help Sought to Locate a Missing 58-Year-Old Man

UPDATE - PUBLIC'S HELP SOUGHT TO LOCATE A MISSING 58-YEAR-OLD MAN


News Release from Portland Police Bureau
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 12:54 PM
58-year-old Jose Ruelas-Mora was found deceased on June 15, 2017, a few blocks from his home. The Oregon State Medical Examiner determined Ruelas-Mora died of self-inflicted stab wounds.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The Portland Police Bureau's Missing Persons Unit is asking for the public's help to locate 58-year-old Jose Ruelas-Mora.

Ruelas-Mora is described as a Hispanic male, 6'1" tall, 190 pounds, black hair and brown eyes.

Ruelas-Mora's family reported that he left his Centennial Neighborhood home in Southeast Portland overnight after making statements indicating he may be suffering from a mental health crisis.

Anyone seeing Ruelas-Mora is asked to call 9-1-1 so officers can check his welfare. Anyone with non-emergency information about him is asked to contact Detective Lori Fonken at 503-823-1081, lori.fonken@portlandoregon.gov.

###PPB###
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UPDATE - Crash Investigation Underway on Southeast 122nd Avenue - Bicycle Rider Critically Injured

UPDATE - CRASH INVESTIGATION UNDERWAY ON SOUTHEAST 122ND AVENUE - BICYCLE RIDER CRITICALLY INJURED


News Release from Portland Police Bureau
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 12:45 PM
The bicycle rider injured in Wednesday afternoon's crash has been identified as 35-year-old Abdikadir Ahmed Omar of Southeast Portland. He remains in a Portland hospital in serious condition with head injuries.

The driver, 33-year-old Nicolette Ivy Duffus of Northeast Portland, remained at the scene and cooperated with the investigation.

Investigators learned that both Omar and Duffus were traveling southbound on 122nd Avenue. Omar veered out of the bike lane and collided with Duffus' vehicle causing him to crash. Omar was not wearing a bicycle helmet at the time of the crash. Investigators determined that Omar was under the influence of alcohol at the time of the crash.

Omar may be issued traffic and/or criminal citations once the investigation is complete.

Duffus was issued traffic citations for Driving While Suspended, Driving Uninsured, and Failure to Register a Vehicle.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Wednesday June 21, 2017, at 9:03 p.m., East Precinct and Traffic Division officers responded to the 2300 block of Southeast 122nd Avenue on the report of a traffic crash involving a driver and a bicycle rider.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and located the injured bicycle rider and involved driver. The bicycle rider has been transported to a Portland hospital with traumatic injuries. The driver has remained at the scene.

Southeast 122nd Avenue is closed in both directions, North of Division Street, as officers continue to investigate the circumstances of the crash.

Updates will be provided when they become available.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###
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UPDATE - Pedestrian Critically Injured in Hit and Run Crash in Southeast Portland

UPDATE - PEDESTRIAN CRITICALLY INJURED IN HIT AND RUN CRASH IN SOUTHEAST PORTLAND


News Release from Portland Police Bureau
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 12:24 PM
The young woman critically injured yesterday afternoon has been identified as 26-year-old Erin Catherine Brenneman of Southeast Portland. Brenneman remains at a Portland hospital in critical condition with life-threatening injuries.

At this point in the investigation, investigators have not developed any suspect information or vehicle description.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Officer Phil Maynard at 503-823-2216, phillip.maynard@portlandoregon.gov.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Thursday June 22, 2017, at 3:14 p.m., East Precinct and Traffic Division officers responded to Southeast 80th Avenue and Pine Street on the report of a female in her 20s down in the street suffering from traumatic injuries.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and located the victim, who was transported by ambulance to a Portland hospital with life-threatening injuries.

Preliminary investigation indicates that she was struck by a driver who fled the scene. At this point in the investigation, there is no suspect information.

The Traffic Division's Major Crash Team has responded to conduct an investigation into the crash.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call the Police Non-Emergency Line at 503-823-3333.

Updates will be provided when they become available.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###
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Fireworks - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe

FIREWORKS - KEEP IT LEGAL, KEEP IT SAFE


News Release from Oregon State Fire Marshal
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 11:52 AM
The Office of State Fire Marshal, Oregon fire service, Keep Oregon Green, the Pacific Northwest Wildfire Coordination Group, natural resource agencies, Oregon fireworks wholesalers, and safety experts encourage Oregonians to "Keep it Legal and Keep it Safe" when using fireworks. The 2017 Oregon fireworks sales season opens Friday, June 23 and runs through Thursday, July 6. The OSFM and their partners want everyone to know what fireworks are legal in Oregon, where they are permitted, and the important steps to take for fireworks safety.

"I want to remind all Oregonians that consumer legal fireworks can only be purchased from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands," says State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. "And, regulations limit where those fireworks may be used.

July 4th holiday forest visitors are advised to leave all fireworks at home. The use of fireworks is prohibited on all national forestland, and most other public lands. "Fireworks compound the threat to already dry forests," states Keep Oregon Green President Kristin Babbs. "Enjoy fireworks where they belong: on the pavement- safely away from houses, vehicles, and flammable vegetation."

Oregon law prohibits possession, use, or sale of any firework that flies into the air, explodes, or travels more than 12 feet horizontally on the ground, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman Candles, and firecrackers are illegal in Oregon, without a permit.

There were 192 reported fireworks-related fires in Oregon during 2016, resulting in more than $519,000 in property damage. Over the past five years, from 2012 through 2016, there were 944 reported fireworks-related fires in Oregon resulting in one death and more than $2.1 million in property damage.

Officials may seize illegal fireworks and fine offenders up to $500 per violation. Those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage are liable and may be required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. Parents are also liable for fireworks damage caused by their children.

"All Oregonians share the responsibility to use only consumer legal fireworks and use them carefully," adds Walker. And we encourage you to be aware and considerate of neighbors and their pets, before deciding on when and where you choose to light fireworks."

The OSFM encourages everyone to use the four B's of safe fireworks use:
* Be Prepared before lighting fireworks: keep water available by using a garden hose or bucket.
* Be Safe when lighting fireworks: keep children and pets away from fireworks.
* Be Responsible after lighting fireworks: never relight a dud. Wait 15 to 20 minutes then soak it in a bucket of water before disposal.
* Be Aware: use only legal fireworks and use them only in legal places.

The four B's of fireworks safety brochure is available here:
http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Licensing_permits/fireworks/4BesFireworks.pdf.
Tips in Spanish are also available at: http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Licensing_permits/fireworks/Fireworks_4Bs_Spanish.pdf.
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River Temperatures Dangerous Despite Heat Wave (Photo)

RIVER TEMPERATURES DANGEROUS DESPITE HEAT WAVE (PHOTO)


News Release from Longview Police & Fire
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 11:36 AM
Downloadable file: Life Jacket Loaner Boards
Longview, WA -- With forecasters calling for temperatures that may approach 100 degrees this weekend, many will take to the water to get relief. Cowlitz River temperatures are hovering near 48 degrees Fahrenheit; swimmers will be risking the loss of muscle control, poor coordination, and the increased danger of drowning within minutes of entering the cold water.

In Washington, drowning is the second leading cause of unintentional injury and death among ages 1 to 17. Most drownings occur on inland waters (lakes and rivers). Drowning due to cold water can be prevented. The best strategy is to wear a life jacket and limit your exposure to the water.

"If you do not have a life jacket, there are several economical options to obtain them", said Sarah Hoskins. She noted that Safe Kids Lower Columbia has placed life jacket loaner boards ad Willow Grove Park, County Line Park, Castle Rock Boat Launch, Horseshoe Lake, and Merwin Dam. If you would like to purchase a reduced cost life jacket, 25% off coupons are available at the Longview Fire Department, redeemable at Big 5 Sporting Goods or Bob's Sporting Goods, Said Hoskins.

Remember, life jackets float, you don't!

Sarah Hoskins is an Administrative Assistant with the Longview Fire Department and is the Chair of Safe Kids Lower Columbia. Persons or businesses interested in helping to support the life jacket loaner board project can contact Sarah at 360-442-5501.
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Law Enforcement Agencies Work Together to Keep Local Highways Safe (Photo)

LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES WORK TOGETHER TO KEEP LOCAL HIGHWAYS SAFE (PHOTO)


News Release from Washington County Sheriff's Office
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 11:25 AM
Downloadable file: Photo
Downloadable file: Photo
Downloadable file: Media Release (PDF)
June 23, 2017 -- Deputies conducted 93 traffic stops and issued 65 citations during an inter-agency traffic enforcement mission on local highways.

On June 22, 2017, Washington County Sheriff's Office deputies from the Traffic Safety Unit partnered with the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, Marion County Sheriff's Office, and Oregon State Police to concentrate enforcement efforts on speeding, with the goal of enhancing public safety on local highways. Deputies were also on the lookout for other traffic violations.

During the one-day mission, Washington County Sheriff's deputies took the following enforcement action:

* Total traffic stops: 93

* Citations issued: 65 (speed: 60, driving while suspended:5)

* Arrests made: 2 (warrant, felony driving while suspended)

* Commercial motor vehicle truck inspections: 7

Deputies also responded to a reported drunk driver seen driving erratically on Highway 26 near Cornell Road. Deputies were able to locate and stop the vehicle, and learned the driver was having a medical emergency. Deputies quickly called for medical assistance and the driver was transported to the hospital for care.

Speed contributes to one third of all traffic-related crashes. Deputies remind drivers to slow down, wear seatbelts, move over and slow down for emergency vehicles, and drive free of distractions such as cell phones.

Media interested in statistics from the other participating agencies are asked to contact them for additional information.
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World Naked Bike Ride Tomorrow Night #PDXWNBR - Riders Urged to Wear Helmets and Shoes (Photo)

WORLD NAKED BIKE RIDE TOMORROW NIGHT #PDXWNBR - RIDERS URGED TO WEAR HELMETS AND SHOES (PHOTO)


News Release from Portland Police Bureau
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 11:18 AM
Downloadable file: WNBR.jpg
The World Naked Bike Ride is set to roll through the streets of Portland on Saturday June 24, 2017, at 9:00 p.m., starting from Northeast Portland's Fernhill Park and ride throughout the city.

In past years, this event has drawn an estimated 10,000 bicycle riders. According to the World Naked Bike Ride website, the event is an annual, worldwide bike ride that highlights the vulnerability of cyclists everywhere and decries society's dependence on pollution-based transport.

The Portland Police Bureau will have officers dedicated to the event to ensure everyone is safe and to provide assistance at intersections. There may be short traffic delays and drivers or non-participants are asked in advance for their patience.

Portland City Code 14A.40.030 (Indecent Exposure) states the following:

It is unlawful for any person to expose his or her genitalia while in a public place or place visible from a public place, if the public place is open or available to persons of the opposite sex.

Although many participants may violate the letter of the Portland City Code, the Police Bureau will be exercising discretion for this protest event as long as participants stay on the route with the rest of the riders. People who "start early" and potentially disrupt other neighborhood events not associated with the official ride may not receive the same discretion.

At a bare minimum, the Portland Police Bureau recommends that riders at least wear a helmet and shoes to avoid any potential injuries. Bike lights are also highly recommended for riders as well as plenty of water or fluids.

For more information on the ride, visit http://www.pdxwnbr.org

###PPB###
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MacArthur Statue to be Unveiled on Saturday at Korean War Remembrance Ceremony

MACARTHUR STATUE TO BE UNVEILED ON SATURDAY AT KOREAN WAR REMEMBRANCE CEREMONY


News Release from City of Wilsonville
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 11:12 AM
On Saturday, June 24, at 10:00 a.m. at the Korean War Memorial in Wilsonville's Town Center Park, 29600 Park Place, the Korean War Memorial Foundation of Oregon (KWMFO) is hosting a Korean War Remembrance Ceremony that is free and open to the public. The event is being held with assistance from the Oregon Trail Chapter Korean War Veterans Association.

This year the annual event includes a special unveiling of a life-size bronze statue of General Douglas MacArthur who served as the commander of the U.S. led United Nations forces during the war from 1950-1951. The statue was commissioned by the Korean War Memorial Foundation of Oregon and was fabricated and installed by Nick Christensen of Brodin Studios & NKC Sculptures Inc, a bronze sculpture artist based in Litchfield, Minnesota.

The purpose of the ceremony is to commemorate the start of the Korean War that began in June of 1950 and also to remember the 298 Oregonians that gave their lives during the war that ultimately resulted in providing freedom to the people of South Korea.

The event features major speakers, including:
* Tim Knapp, Mayor of Wilsonville
* Duk-ho Moon, Consul General of the Republic of Korea in Seattle
* Brig. General Mark Crosby, Oregon Military Department
* Joseph Glover, Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs
* Kyeong Hei Won, Mayor of the City of Yeoju, Korea
* Bob Cassidy, President of the Oregon Trail Chapter of the Korean War Veterans Association

The event also includes patriotic music, a flyover by the West Coast Ravens, the presence of many Korean War veterans, and special musical entertainment from a "Living Treasure" visiting from Korea.

For information or questions, email: Greg Caldwell at caldwell@lclark.edu.
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Red Cross Issues Hot Weather Safety Tips (Photo)

RED CROSS ISSUES HOT WEATHER SAFETY TIPS (PHOTO)


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 9:29 AM
Downloadable file: Hot Weather Safety Graphic
Downloadable file: News Release - Red Cross Issues Heat Safety Tips
Extreme temperatures are expected this weekend. Know the steps you should take to stay safe and avoid heat-related illness.


BEND, Ore., June 23, 2017 -- Extreme temperatures are in the forecast for the weekend and the American Red Cross urges residents to be aware of the steps they should take to avoid heat related illness. Follow these simple, tried and true steps to keep yourself and others safe before and during a heat wave.

Before
* Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes.
* Be aware of both the temperature and the heat index. The heat index is the temperature the body feels when the effects of heat and humidity are combined.
* Check the contents of your disaster preparedness kit to ensure it has enough water and non-perishable food items, just in case. For a full kit list, visit redcross.org/PrepareGuide.
* Look out for your neighbors -- people who are elderly, young or sick are more likely to become victims of heat-related illness and may need your help.
* If you do not have air conditioning, locate places you could go to find relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls). Many government websites provide a list of available cooling centers.
* Ensure that your animals' needs for water and shade are met.

During
* Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).
* Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles, not even for a few minutes. According to the National Weather Service, a car left in 80 degree weather yielded an inside temperature of 95 degrees and rising in just two minutes.
* Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
* Eat small meals and eat more often.
* Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun's rays.
* Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day (late afternoon/evening).
* Postpone outdoor games and activities (participants and spectators).
* Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat.
* Take frequent breaks if you must work outdoors.
* Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
* Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.


How to Treat Heat-Related Illnesses
During heat waves people are susceptible to several heat-related conditions. Here's how to recognize and respond to them.

Heat Cramps
Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that usually occur in the legs or abdomen. Heat cramps are often an early sign that the body is having trouble with the heat.
* Get the person to a cooler place and have him or her rest in a comfortable position. Lightly stretch the affected muscle.
* Give an electrolyte-containing fluid, such as a sports drink. Water may also be given.

Heat Exhaustion
Heat exhaustion is a more severe condition than heat cramps. Heat exhaustion often affects athletes, firefighters and construction workers. It also affects those wearing heavy clothing in a hot, humid environment.
* Signs of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale, ashen or flushed skin; headache; nausea; dizziness; weakness; and exhaustion.
* Move the person to a cooler environment with circulating air. Remove or loosen as much clothing as possible and apply cool, wet towels to the skin. Fanning or spraying the person with water also can help. If the person is conscious, give small amounts of a cool fluid such as a sports drink or fruit juice to restore fluids and electrolytes. Give about 4 ounces of fluid every 15 minutes.
* If the person's condition does not improve or if he or she refuses water, has a change in consciousness, or vomits, call 9-1-1.

Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that usually occurs by ignoring the signals of heat exhaustion. Heat stroke develops when the body systems are overwhelmed by heat and begin to stop functioning.
* Signs of heat stroke include extremely high body temperature, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; confusion; vomiting; and seizures.
* Heat stroke is life-threatening. Call 9-1-1 immediately if you believe someone is suffering from this condition.
* Rapidly cool the body by immersing the person up to the neck in cold water, if possible OR douse or spray the person with cold water.
* Cover the person with bags of ice or cold, wet towels.
* If you are not able to measure and monitor the person's temperature, apply rapid cooling methods for 20 minutes or until the person's condition improves.

Download the Red Cross Emergency App
* Find the FREE Red Cross Emergency App in the Apple Store or Google Play
* It offers a Heat Wave Safety Checklist, among many other resources
* It provides expert medical advice right at your fingertips
* It's available in multiple languages

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades
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Red Cross Issues Hot Weather Safety Tips (Photo)

RED CROSS ISSUES HOT WEATHER SAFETY TIPS (PHOTO)


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 9:25 AM
Downloadable file: Hot Weather Safety Graphic
Downloadable file: News Release - Red Cross Issues Heat Safety Tips
Extreme temperatures are expected this weekend. Know the steps you should take to stay safe and avoid heat-related illness.


MEDFORD, Ore., June 23, 2017 -- Extreme temperatures are in the forecast for the weekend and the American Red Cross urges residents to be aware of the steps they should take to avoid heat related illness. Follow these simple, tried and true steps to keep yourself and others safe before and during a heat wave.

Before
* Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes.
* Be aware of both the temperature and the heat index. The heat index is the temperature the body feels when the effects of heat and humidity are combined.
* Check the contents of your disaster preparedness kit to ensure it has enough water and non-perishable food items, just in case. For a full kit list, visit redcross.org/PrepareGuide.
* Look out for your neighbors -- people who are elderly, young or sick are more likely to become victims of heat-related illness and may need your help.
* If you do not have air conditioning, locate places you could go to find relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls). Many government websites provide a list of available cooling centers.
* Ensure that your animals' needs for water and shade are met.

During
* Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).
* Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles, not even for a few minutes. According to the National Weather Service, a car left in 80 degree weather yielded an inside temperature of 95 degrees and rising in just two minutes.
* Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
* Eat small meals and eat more often.
* Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun's rays.
* Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day (late afternoon/evening).
* Postpone outdoor games and activities (participants and spectators).
* Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat.
* Take frequent breaks if you must work outdoors.
* Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
* Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.


How to Treat Heat-Related Illnesses
During heat waves people are susceptible to several heat-related conditions. Here's how to recognize and respond to them.

Heat Cramps
Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that usually occur in the legs or abdomen. Heat cramps are often an early sign that the body is having trouble with the heat.
* Get the person to a cooler place and have him or her rest in a comfortable position. Lightly stretch the affected muscle.
* Give an electrolyte-containing fluid, such as a sports drink. Water may also be given.

Heat Exhaustion
Heat exhaustion is a more severe condition than heat cramps. Heat exhaustion often affects athletes, firefighters and construction workers. It also affects those wearing heavy clothing in a hot, humid environment.
* Signs of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale, ashen or flushed skin; headache; nausea; dizziness; weakness; and exhaustion.
* Move the person to a cooler environment with circulating air. Remove or loosen as much clothing as possible and apply cool, wet towels to the skin. Fanning or spraying the person with water also can help. If the person is conscious, give small amounts of a cool fluid such as a sports drink or fruit juice to restore fluids and electrolytes. Give about 4 ounces of fluid every 15 minutes.
* If the person's condition does not improve or if he or she refuses water, has a change in consciousness, or vomits, call 9-1-1.

Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that usually occurs by ignoring the signals of heat exhaustion. Heat stroke develops when the body systems are overwhelmed by heat and begin to stop functioning.
* Signs of heat stroke include extremely high body temperature, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; confusion; vomiting; and seizures.
* Heat stroke is life-threatening. Call 9-1-1 immediately if you believe someone is suffering from this condition.
* Rapidly cool the body by immersing the person up to the neck in cold water, if possible OR douse or spray the person with cold water.
* Cover the person with bags of ice or cold, wet towels.
* If you are not able to measure and monitor the person's temperature, apply rapid cooling methods for 20 minutes or until the person's condition improves.

Download the Red Cross Emergency App
* Find the FREE Red Cross Emergency App in the Apple Store or Google Play
* It offers a Heat Wave Safety Checklist, among many other resources
* It provides expert medical advice right at your fingertips
* It's available in multiple languages

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades
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Red Cross Issues Hot Weather Safety Tips (Photo)

RED CROSS ISSUES HOT WEATHER SAFETY TIPS (PHOTO)


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 9:22 AM
Downloadable file: Hot Weather Safety Graphic
Downloadable file: News Release - Red Cross Issues Heat Safety Tips
Extreme temperatures are expected this weekend. Know the steps you should take to stay safe and avoid heat-related illness.


EUGENE, Ore., June 23, 2017 -- Extreme temperatures are in the forecast for the weekend and the American Red Cross urges residents to be aware of the steps they should take to avoid heat related illness. Follow these simple, tried and true steps to keep yourself and others safe before and during a heat wave.

Before
* Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes.
* Be aware of both the temperature and the heat index. The heat index is the temperature the body feels when the effects of heat and humidity are combined.
* Check the contents of your disaster preparedness kit to ensure it has enough water and non-perishable food items, just in case. For a full kit list, visit redcross.org/PrepareGuide.
* Look out for your neighbors -- people who are elderly, young or sick are more likely to become victims of heat-related illness and may need your help.
* If you do not have air conditioning, locate places you could go to find relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls). Many government websites provide a list of available cooling centers.
* Ensure that your animals' needs for water and shade are met.

During
* Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).
* Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles, not even for a few minutes. According to the National Weather Service, a car left in 80 degree weather yielded an inside temperature of 95 degrees and rising in just two minutes.
* Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
* Eat small meals and eat more often.
* Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun's rays.
* Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day (late afternoon/evening).
* Postpone outdoor games and activities (participants and spectators).
* Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat.
* Take frequent breaks if you must work outdoors.
* Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
* Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.


How to Treat Heat-Related Illnesses
During heat waves people are susceptible to several heat-related conditions. Here's how to recognize and respond to them.

Heat Cramps
Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that usually occur in the legs or abdomen. Heat cramps are often an early sign that the body is having trouble with the heat.
* Get the person to a cooler place and have him or her rest in a comfortable position. Lightly stretch the affected muscle.
* Give an electrolyte-containing fluid, such as a sports drink. Water may also be given.

Heat Exhaustion
Heat exhaustion is a more severe condition than heat cramps. Heat exhaustion often affects athletes, firefighters and construction workers. It also affects those wearing heavy clothing in a hot, humid environment.
* Signs of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale, ashen or flushed skin; headache; nausea; dizziness; weakness; and exhaustion.
* Move the person to a cooler environment with circulating air. Remove or loosen as much clothing as possible and apply cool, wet towels to the skin. Fanning or spraying the person with water also can help. If the person is conscious, give small amounts of a cool fluid such as a sports drink or fruit juice to restore fluids and electrolytes. Give about 4 ounces of fluid every 15 minutes.
* If the person's condition does not improve or if he or she refuses water, has a change in consciousness, or vomits, call 9-1-1.

Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that usually occurs by ignoring the signals of heat exhaustion. Heat stroke develops when the body systems are overwhelmed by heat and begin to stop functioning.
* Signs of heat stroke include extremely high body temperature, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; confusion; vomiting; and seizures.
* Heat stroke is life-threatening. Call 9-1-1 immediately if you believe someone is suffering from this condition.
* Rapidly cool the body by immersing the person up to the neck in cold water, if possible OR douse or spray the person with cold water.
* Cover the person with bags of ice or cold, wet towels.
* If you are not able to measure and monitor the person's temperature, apply rapid cooling methods for 20 minutes or until the person's condition improves.

Download the Red Cross Emergency App
* Find the FREE Red Cross Emergency App in the Apple Store or Google Play
* It offers a Heat Wave Safety Checklist, among many other resources
* It provides expert medical advice right at your fingertips
* It's available in multiple languages

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades
Sent via FlashAlert Newswire. Replies to this message do NOT go back to the sender.
Click here to change or delete these messages.

Red Cross Issues Hot Weather Safety Tips (Photo)

RED CROSS ISSUES HOT WEATHER SAFETY TIPS (PHOTO)


News Release from American Red Cross - Cascades Region
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2017 9:17 AM
Downloadable file: Hot Weather Safety Graphic
Downloadable file: News Release - Red Cross Issues Heat Safety Tips
Extreme temperatures are expected this weekend. Know the steps you should take to stay safe and avoid heat-related illness.


PORTLAND, Ore., June 23, 2017 -- Extreme temperatures are in the forecast for the weekend and the American Red Cross urges residents to be aware of the steps they should take to avoid heat related illness. Follow these simple, tried and true steps to keep yourself and others safe before and during a heat wave.

Before
* Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes.
* Be aware of both the temperature and the heat index. The heat index is the temperature the body feels when the effects of heat and humidity are combined.
* Check the contents of your disaster preparedness kit to ensure it has enough water and non-perishable food items, just in case. For a full kit list, visit redcross.org/PrepareGuide.
* Look out for your neighbors -- people who are elderly, young or sick are more likely to become victims of heat-related illness and may need your help.
* If you do not have air conditioning, locate places you could go to find relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls). Many government websites provide a list of available cooling centers.
* Ensure that your animals' needs for water and shade are met.

During
* Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).
* Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles, not even for a few minutes. According to the National Weather Service, a car left in 80 degree weather yielded an inside temperature of 95 degrees and rising in just two minutes.
* Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
* Eat small meals and eat more often.
* Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun's rays.
* Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day (late afternoon/evening).
* Postpone outdoor games and activities (participants and spectators).
* Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat.
* Take frequent breaks if you must work outdoors.
* Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
* Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.


How to Treat Heat-Related Illnesses
During heat waves people are susceptible to several heat-related conditions. Here's how to recognize and respond to them.

Heat Cramps
Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that usually occur in the legs or abdomen. Heat cramps are often an early sign that the body is having trouble with the heat.
* Get the person to a cooler place and have him or her rest in a comfortable position. Lightly stretch the affected muscle.
* Give an electrolyte-containing fluid, such as a sports drink. Water may also be given.

Heat Exhaustion
Heat exhaustion is a more severe condition than heat cramps. Heat exhaustion often affects athletes, firefighters and construction workers. It also affects those wearing heavy clothing in a hot, humid environment.
* Signs of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale, ashen or flushed skin; headache; nausea; dizziness; weakness; and exhaustion.
* Move the person to a cooler environment with circulating air. Remove or loosen as much clothing as possible and apply cool, wet towels to the skin. Fanning or spraying the person with water also can help. If the person is conscious, give small amounts of a cool fluid such as a sports drink or fruit juice to restore fluids and electrolytes. Give about 4 ounces of fluid every 15 minutes.
* If the person's condition does not improve or if he or she refuses water, has a change in consciousness, or vomits, call 9-1-1.

Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that usually occurs by ignoring the signals of heat exhaustion. Heat stroke develops when the body systems are overwhelmed by heat and begin to stop functioning.
* Signs of heat stroke include extremely high body temperature, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; confusion; vomiting; and seizures.
* Heat stroke is life-threatening. Call 9-1-1 immediately if you believe someone is suffering from this condition.
* Rapidly cool the body by immersing the person up to the neck in cold water, if possible OR douse or spray the person with cold water.
* Cover the person with bags of ice or cold, wet towels.
* If you are not able to measure and monitor the person's temperature, apply rapid cooling methods for 20 minutes or until the person's condition improves.

Download the Red Cross Emergency App
* Find the FREE Red Cross Emergency App in the Apple Store or Google Play
* It offers a Heat Wave Safety Checklist, among many other resources
* It provides expert medical advice right at your fingertips
* It's available in multiple languages

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades
Sent via FlashAlert Newswire. Replies to this message do NOT go back to the sender.
Click here to change or delete these messages.